Nepal-UN cooperation in Peacekeeping

The Institute of Foreign Affairs, IFA, organized an talk program titled “Nepal-UN cooperation in Peacekeeping” on the 21st of July, 2014. The Chief Guest and keynote speaker at this program was Herve Ladsous, the Under-Secretary-General for Peacekeeping of the United Nations. Madhuraman Acharya, former Nepal ambassador to the UN also presented a paper titled “Changing Score and Dimension of Peacekeeping and the participation of Nepal”, and the Executive Director of IFA, Dr.Rishi Raj Adhikari, had given a few words of welcome to all those present.

Welcome speech ED Peacekeeping talk program

Dr. Rishi Raj Adhikari
Executive Director
Institute of Foreign Affairs (IFA)

  • Chairperson of the talk program, Officiating Secretary of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Mr. Shankar Das Bairagi
  • Honorable Under Secretary General of the United Nations and Head of Peacekeeping Operations Department, HE Herve Ladsous and other members of his visit team 
  • Mr. Madhu Raman Acharya, former PR to UN and today’s presenter 
  • Other distinguished participants from Diplomatic community, army, police, friends from media, foreign ministry and IFA

Our Hearty Welcome to you all in this important occasion of discussions on UN        Peacekeeping operations.

I extend my welcome and appreciation to HE Ladsous to have taken time out to visit Nepal inspite of your busy schedule.

Your visit to Nepal will enhance mutual relationship, understanding and cooperation between UN and Nepal as we are the sixth main country supplying army and police to the UN for peacekeeping. I am confident that your visit will further consolidate our ties.

Peacekeeping has become multifaceted and widespread in the recent days and Nepal is and always will be ready to contribute to the global peace and security with our world class security personnel who have been appreciated very much globally.

The strength of our security personnel is the commitment towards responsibility and track records on capacity and capability which has always been of highest quality and standards.

Nepal has been responding in time without delay to the call of UN and has been showing flexibility in inter-mission transfers.

Our commitment to world peacekeeping has been manifested by the fact that we have been sending our army and police at short notices, in security-wise sensitive areas and to the countries with internal conflicts.

Nepal is sensitive towards selection of personnel to be included in such a complicated and sensitive work as peacekeeping. Nepal has developed and uses vetting system as per UN standards. The selected personnel are pre-trained on human rights, gender violence and related subjects before departure.

Nepal welcomes and requests for providing the Integrated Training Services (ITS) under DPKO to enhance the capacity of our personnel through mobilization of Mobile Training Support Team.

Based on Nepal’s long and uninterrupted quality participation in the peacekeeping operations we believe we should duly and honorably be represented at leadership positions at both the headquarters and the field missions.

We express our belief that the cooperative relationships between Nepal and UN for peacekeeping operation will expand some more and be strengthened in the days to come.

I wish Your Excellency and the team a successful and happy stay in Nepal.

I once again welcome you all in this important talk program on UN     peacekeeping.

Thank you very much,


Click here to download UN Peacekeeping Presentation.


Ladsous Speech

Keynote speech by HE Herve Ladsous

Distinguishes Colleagues, Ladies and gentlemen

Let me begin by expressing my appreciation for Nepal’s long-standing contribution to United Nations peacekeeping. No doubt some of you here today have served in peacekeeping operations around the world and I thank you for this service.

Nepal’s participation in peacekeeping stretches back to the institution’s earliest days. In 1958, only three years after Nepal joined the United Nations, your country contributed troops to the fourth ever UN peacekeeping mission, the UN Military Observer Group in Lebanon. (UNOGIL) Over the past half century, Nepal has provided close to 100,000 peacekeepers to 46 different peace operations.

Current Contributions

Today, Nepal ranks fifth among all troop and police contributing countries, having consistently ranked among the top ten contributors of uniformed personnel for more than a decade now. No other TCC/PCC is represented is so many missions, with Nepal currently deployed in twelve peacekeeping missions, as well as UNAMI. Nepal is also working to increase the number of female personnel it deploys and has been ranked in the top ten in the last several years for total contributions of female uniformed personnel.

United Nations peacekeeping operations have welcomed Nepalese contributions at the highest levels, including Brigadier General Basnet Thapa and Brigadier General Kuman Pun, the current Deputy Force Commanders of UNDOF and UNKISS. Nepal has also previously provided force commanders over the years to UNDOF, UNIKOM in Kuwait and Iraq, UNFICYP in Cyprus, and the Chief of Staff to UNTSO.

With regard to contributions of police personnel, Nepal is the fifth largest contributor and ranks third among Asian contributors. Nine hundred Nepalese police are currently deployed in a range of missions, including five Formed Police Units (FPUs). Nepal has also provided important support to the development of the Strategic Guidance Framework for International Police Peacekeeping and subsidiary police guidance.

Mission Deployments

Your recent assistance in South Sudan and the Middle East following deterioration in those regions are two recent examples of ways in which Nepal has stepped in quickly and effectively to support places in need.

We would especially like to recognize the support of Nepal for agreeing to deploy an FPU from UNMIL to south Sudan following the outbreak of conflict in December, in addition to a surge infantry battalion. When requested to move the FPU under inter-mission cooperation, Nepal was one of two PCCs that immediately responded positively. To provide additional support, Nepal strengthened the FPU’s capacities. Over the past several months, the FPU has played a critical role in protecting and maintaining order among IDPs in Protection of Civilians sites inside UNMISS bases. During the heinous attack by armed militia on IDPs in the POC site in Bor in April, the contingent moved swiftly to disrupt the assault and protect numerous IDPs and UN staff.

Following recent events in the areas of operation of UNIFI, UNTSO and UNDOF, we must particularly express appreciation for the continued support that Nepal is giving to these missions. Nepal’s quick response in deploying its contingent to UNDOF last year arrived at a time of critical need for the UN, and we are grateful to Nepal for staying the course. For UNTSO, we appreciate the fact that Nepal has refused to issue any caveats to its military observers. I can assure you that we are working to implement strengthened safety and security measures. The security of our troops is of utmost concern during this challenging time in the region.

Training and Capabilities

The United Nations is working to help ensure that troops are well-trained and well-prepared for their operating environments, including through the development of military pre-deployment training modules. Nepal has helped produce large numbers of professional peacekeepers from the country and the region for nearly thirty years.

In New York, we are constantly on the lookout for specialized capabilities to supplement our large-scale troop deployments. These specialized capabilities act as force multipliers, supporting and extending the efforts of our infantry battalions. Nepal has helped out in some these areas as well, including through the Nepalese Engineering Company based with MONUSCO in North Kivu and the upcoming deployment of a Close Protection Unit for the UNDOF force Commander.

We continue to work to strengthen the guidance we provide to our troops, as well as to develop standards to ensure that we are fielding highly professional, well-trained contingents. We would like to thank Nepal for its strong support of the effort to develop UN military Unit Manuals (UNMUM) relating to eleven enabling capabilities. Nepal’s participation in the logistics working group has been particularly helpful.

By means of further strengthening our partnership, I would like to share with you some of the most urgent needs that we face in our missions today, particularly, the most recent ones deployed in CA< and Mali. We need to identify peacekeepers with the appropriate language skills, especially French, to enable interaction with local security forces and the population. We are working with contributors, like Nepal, to increase deployments of female personnel, both at the ground level and in higher posts. I welcome your thoughts on how we can work together toward this end. Finally, the provision of effective, well maintained contingent owned equipment and self-sustainment capabilities is critical for ensuring the full operational capabilities of military and police contingents.

Nepal’s Policy Voice

In New York, Nepal maintains strong political support and engagement on behalf of peacekeeping and the ideals of the United Nations Charter. We would like to recognize and express or gratitude for Nepal’s status as a reliable partner and friend of DPKO. I hope that I can count on Nepal’s support for the upcoming review of peacekeeping initiated by the Secretary-General, which we anticipate will provide an opportunity to further strengthen of peacekeeping and prepare it for the challenges of the future.

Nepal has lost 69 personnel as a result of its participation in peacekeeping operations in war-torn countries where some 175 million people are striving for a better future.   In the face of the scale of human suffering and the sacrifices being made by the dedicated men and women serving in peacekeeping operations today, peacekeeping is a collective response to ensure that future generations are spare the scourge of war.

Thank You

‘Dhanyawaad’